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20110722
20110722
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
easy. this is a big hour. my next victim. [snickering quietly] next. bet i capture 150. my body is full of many herring. [laughing] where is my robe. it's missing. a temple god must have taken my ladder away. the man started pacing back and forth wondering how to get down. so, the sunlight made one of the birds wake up. bird:i can't breathe. so i must be catching a bad cold. i drank too much, saki rice wine last night. was a little tipsy. i don't remember. any way. think can't move. someone is leaning on me so who is it. my cousin. my brother. we've been got by a hunter. hey! my cousin, wake up. no. not a good morning. we've been caught by a hunter. pass the word but be quiet okay. okay. wake up, wake up, wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. hey! did you wake up? we've been caught by a hunter. right. i got a good plan. just do what i say. at the count of three, you flap your wings as hard as you can. right? 1, 2, 3 - flapping! i can't move. [help me screaming] very good. whoa. i'm going high. very good. wow. what is that. the lake. not the lake. big ri
. that was a special big garden, a forest, where all types of trees and flowers grew. the trees bending down gently flinging branches. our orchard grew like a crown on the sun's eyebrow. where did humbaba come from? his mother was just a cave, his father unknown. who made him a friend pretending guardian of the orchard. did those nice shrubs need fear to go begging for a garden and have humbaba in his treachery ilk. those plants and flowers were like books everyone could read, not cut and throw away. their different fantastic colors had formed our blood so our veins ran smoothly, our 7 wonders showed. then humbaba made a whirlwind of fire and snow. who crowned him king? who showed him our garden was but a jail? humbaba was great and scary, but not so very strong, though no one could ever conquer him as no one would ever try. time and again, when things grew old, humbaba alone believed himself eternal and young, still powerful, able to defeat all. humbaba didn't want to know one fact: that accumulation will lead to eruptive change. but, sadly, when suddenly he realized it after all, he chose to chec
. it was not a big political thing. it was a holiday. we were just going to go and sing sing christmas carols, do some rap songs, whether we could do to cheer up the brothers that were locked up. we started to do it over and over again. it was only 10 years later and that we began to see ways to use that in a more pro-active way. we would come out of a nightclub in new york city, my brother, my cousin, and i. we had had some experience with the police harassing us on the streets. this particular night, somebody had gotten into a fight, we were probably the only black folks in a white neighborhood the party that they were at, they were playing salsa, marvin gaye, and we were hanging out after the birthday party. we got caught up in a situation where the police had been called for shots fired. we happened to be the only black people there, they got us and put us in jail. that was the first day that you mentioned. the long and short of it is, i was in my second year of law school at the time. i am reading all these things about criminal procedure, criminal law. the stuff that is on the books is not
to make their own instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is
to eat these big ice creams in cuba, used lots of cream. most dominica patrons were male but a few foreign women venturing to the famous establishment in the company of men from the court. one of these women was my grandmother, merced moynihan. in la dominica, one of the best cafes in the world, located on oreilly street, where my grandparents met. ticket to ride, i talk about my family history but after they marry -- i am reading a little from the book -- my grandparents were at the center of many fascinating things. i found myself at el centro, the literary and musical gatherings. their house on calle mercades became a cultural cross roads with the traffic of foreigners created a new inspired geography. they travel everywhere. my grandmother, merced, nina played the piano and read poems, while edward read the poems besides playing the fiddle and violin, behaved like an avant garde composer, moving around furniture. according to the journalist were a dynamic duo that rescued the famous hotel sevilla from dereliction in 1919. they also constructed the biltmore neighborhood where ma
. >> are there any milestones established? >> a big one will be in the middle of march. we will get cost analysis from the retirement system on proposals out there. we will be gauging people's reactions to those numbers as a key market. the first couple of weeks of may will be important. that is when various proposals will be introduced in these chambers for the november ballot. june and july is when the board will vote on what goes in front of the electorate in november. those are the key milestones. >> talk about homelessness and how you are planning to deal with that as an issue. >> the key there is funding. everything gets back to that issue. we have a number of wonderful plans in place on how to address the homeless issue. we just cannot afford to. we continue to cut funding to shelters, public health programs that help our homeless population. if we were able to do what we have in place and fund that, we would be a better position on that issue. >> are there any specific programs with respect to homelessness that you feel are moving us in the right direction? >> the watershed moment was 200
development that works for every san franciscan. i think that remains a big issue. and balancing the budget will be a priority. has to be a priority. we will do that. we have done that time and time again. public safety is also something we are very interested in. it has to be a priority, because if we do not have public safety, nothing else works. one of the things we are focusing on is trying to focus on how policing works in san francisco. i used to be a member of the police commission, and i learned that the most effective community policing is the policing where you have the police and the community working together. it is important to have police officers on the street and have the police presence. at the same time, there has to be a connection within the police and the community. so, that requires -- also we have a focus on violence prevention. in the mission, we are focused on gang activity. we have to balance the very important work of the police would be very important violence prevention work -- with the very importance violence prevention work we're doing on the ground. so, publ
of competition has come in from the big boys? you were having a nice conversation earlier. i listen in. do you see yahoo! going local, for example, as a plus, or do you see them as competition? how did you see that? >> first, full disclosure, yahoo! is a content partner for oakland local. they distribute our content on their website. there is some back and forth. some people are wondering what the corporate industries are going to do in a hyperlocal space. i do think there is space for everyone to work together. one of the questions i'm interested in hearing about is whether the corporate entities are interested in working with local entities. we have been working with oakland for the last year-and-a- half, and i have a background in oakland activism, and it has still been difficult for us to get headway as an organization. that kind of community involvement takes a 24/7 kind of commitment. that is slightly different than the commitment it takes to run a yahoo! new site. i'm interested in with the challenges will be, but i'm much more interested in what the opportunities will be. if we keep sa
and sumo wrestlers and how they get so big and what it's like in their culture. one of the brothers becomes an sumo and that's why it's a big book! [laughter]. >> do you think that -- being a woman who is in women have been oppressed -- i don't know if they are now or not, dou think that has stimulated you in your writing coming out of that? you specifically and in general, do you feel like a lot of women have beenstimulated by being part of an oppressed class? >> good question. >> very much so. i will try to answer a, b, c. for me, i know that the first thing i began to think about when i thought i wanted to write a novel was that i wanted to write about my culture. and because i had grownup in the chinese culture i wanted to write about china. i wanted to find out more about myself because of i was raised in the bay area and because i didn't know culturally a lot of things i wanted to know. i knew i wasn't going to write about myself and knew that i was not going to write about my family. but i wanted to write about an aspect about china and women. those were the 2 things i knew when i
in atlanta. entrepreneurship is a big part of it. i did not understand and nobody told me what is involved with buying your own home until i was in my second law school, where is the my counterparts, the white students i was in class with, they had had that information coming up. it was just second nature. i asked the guy across the hall from me what his folks did. but told him my mom was a nurse and my dad was a teacher, a soldier before. he said his father was the deputy prime minister of jordan. i was like, "ok." minute court partner -- my moot court partner, he said his father owned three swiss banks. i think even before entrepreneurship, it is financial literacy. we need to educate ourselves about what these resources are. it is financial literacy and really wealth literacy, understanding that there are different kinds of wealth beyond just monetary wealth, but you need to understand monetary wealth, spiritual well, the social capital we have and understand how to cultivate those things and invest them properly. those are important skills. at the same time, i do not think black capita
black people. that big fight, brown versus the board of education so all the black kids can get an education. [inaudible] the books have pages missing, and they all have things written inside of them. at the main library, we have a demonstration going on. [inaudible] how come we cannot use that facility? they cannot even get a good job and fair pay. men, they come up missing. rape -- they do not want to talk about that, but if it is a white woman, it is on the news, on the radio, on television. i do not want to die like that. so i'm going to stay black and die. if i could do one thing -- >> i told you, you need to move on. do i need to get the police?" >> sir, i picked -- "sir, i paid my fare. it is my constitutional right." the driver gets off the bus. police officers come. they are at the back door. "i had trouble with this girl before." "the two of you need to get up. you know it is against the law." open " i paid my fair -- "i paid my fare. if i move now, i will get sick. i'm pregnant." there is a volunteer. i think he was sensing there was going to be trouble or something.
that they claim don't exist. it is the other big reason for doing this. i want to suggest a couple of things need to be added. this is the fourth attempt to develop, does of the site. they tried in the 1950's and 1990's. the letters from former directors saying that the intention has always been to key the golden gate recreation center permanently their as community benefits. i would like to ask in the environmentally superior alternative, the developer has great rendering at his proposal. we're putting up a nice clear fences. it is part of the deal. this is his advantage to keep it ugly. [chime] please include that. >> hello, my name is jill tannenbau. -- tannenbaum. golden gatway was the only place i could find to play tennis and swim and outside. people come to swim and play tennis, socialize, meet people, do things. it is one of the most exciting places in the city during the summer. i would leave the city, because i have nowhere to go. >> i am showing the area along the waterfront. i tried calling of any -- up any eir that had an underground parking garages. there is no eir that has been dev
know who you can call to get a cab. i am a big believer in pedestrian bicycling as options to get around town. many cities in the world have far more people working or on bicycles into blocking or on bicycles. they are pleasant most of transit and are efficient. -- many cities in the world have far more people walking or on bicycles. they are pleasant and efficient forms of transportation. that will take cars off the road and make it easier for those who drive. if we want to create a world- class transportation system, we have to make a commitment to each of these modes of transit to allow us to move where we need to go. >> is it safe for pedestrians on the streets? >> it is not. in recent years, we have had too many pedestrian accidents. there are estimates it costs our cities several hundred millions a year because of traffic accidents, injuries, and fatalities. i am asking one of our transit agencies to study where we're spending our dollars around the district and whether we invested more money would help to reduce our overall costs that come when a pedestrian is hit by a car.
it at scale, and that has been the big challenge. >> can you elaborate on that? what does that mean exactly? >> we would not exist if there was not a feeling that a lot of these communities do not have the experience online of finding the information that is most relevant to them. there are a lot of great weekly newspapers. there are a lot of bulletin boards, facebook woods, you name it. there is a lot of media focused at local, but not every community has it, and even the ones that do often are not getting the kind of service that i think they used to historical because of downsizing and regional newspapers not serving those communities the way they used to. so you will have the council meeting not really being covered. we have had numerous examples where board meetings, council meetings, things that those members got used to not being covered. suddenly, they were seeing the week after week and seeing that we were there to stay. >> in the audience, do you feel like you're communities are being covered well? do you know what is going on in your back yard? do you feel like your stories being
, "side-by-side." we also thank the wonderful hydra menendez for inviting us today. let's have a big hand for the mckinley elementary school choir. [applause] they are being led by second grade teacher miss yang, miss vantia, miss bryant, and miss petrokie. i think our principal is in here somewhere. ok. there is our principal, rosa song. there she is. [applause] all right. we are ready. ♪ [piano playing] ♪ [piano playing] [piano music playing] [applause] [piano playing] [applause] [piano playing] >> give it up one more time for the mckinley elementary second and third graders. [applause] >> i'd like to acknowledge scott wiener. thank you for joining us. i'd like to acknowledge my colleague, sandy, for joinin gus. -- joining us. and at this time, i'd like to welcome ed lee, the mayor of san francisco. [applause] >> thank you, hydra and mckinley students. thank you very much. supervisor weiner, i thin kwe k we have the official song, next time i go t otho the boardf supervisors, we need side by side. we ain't got a barrell of money. thank you for coming today. i want to say that i reme
where there's a big boulder jammed into the bottom. every place has this backward trail, this labyrinth, leading you around. i was walking arpd this maze for about an hour before coming here and it does the same kind of thing where your mind settles, where you have to pay attention to where you are going. because if you look up for too long at all the passing architecture, you will forget where you are on the maze. you will end up in the wrong spot. you will end up going the wrong direction and you won't be able to find your way to the center. of course, out in the desert, you can't just walk off of the maze and out the front door and back into the street. out in the desert, you are there. the cliffs stand around you. the mazes are everywhere, passages opening up left and right. to write this book, house of rain, i walked a little bit over a thousand miles in legs from the four corners region from arizona, new mexico, colorado and california meet down to the chijuajua area of new mexico. there was one excavation along the way i remember out in the desert nears winslow, arizona. the dese
of the smokestack kitchen. they narrow the big sea sba a line of your sweat and then they take away your last word and then they take away another. now you put the keys back in your pocket and now you push on the door until it is in flame, until it is in flame. next reader is jane herschfield. . >> one sand grain among the others in winter wind. i wake with my hand held over the place of grief in my body. depend on nothing, the voice advices, but even that is useless. my ears are useless, my familiar and intimate tongue, my protecting hand is useless that wants to hold the single leaf to the tree and say, not this one. this one will be saved. a poem written on september 15th, 2001, against the knowledge that exactly what would happen was probably going to happen. the dead do not want us dead. the dead do not want us dead. such petty errors are left for the living. nor do they want our mourning. no gift to them. not rage, not weeping. return one of them, any one of them, to the earth and look. such foolish skipping, such telling of bad jokes, such feasting. even a cucumber, even a single anise seed
the flow -- float in our charter, and that is a big distinction with the alternative proposal that is still being marketed by mr. adachi. it is important for you to know that. that distinction called vested rights. many cities across the country -- when they have not considered the employees' pension has a vested right, they get into legal trouble very quickly. that is why you see litigation around the country sponsored by employee groups who have never been consulted with, being demanded that they pay more into the pension, but there is no consideration of their vested rights. that concept is embedded in our measure were in good and bad times, we share, so they get something out of this reform. because they get something out of it, they are vested in it. the unions continue to view, as i do, that the alternative proposal being sponsored by mr. adachi does not consider vested rights and therefore will be litigated. in that litigation, there is a great chance in my opinion that the proposal will lose. i am not the city attorney, but if you ask the city attorney, as we have -- and we have tha
. i was not in business until 1961. he made a big deal out of working in clay. the things he was doing was something never seen before. >> it is a large scale bronze. it has been sitting here of the hall of justice since 1971. talk about what happens to the work of art out of the elements. >> the arts commission commissioned the piece. they did not set aside money for repair. it has slowly changed color. it was black. it has been restored. >> it has been restored to the original patina. >> there was no damage done to its. i do not think there were any holes made in it. they have been working on it for six or eight weeks. it is practically ready to go. i am very excited to see it done. >> over the course of the arts in richmond program, we have added almost 800 works of art into the public space. maintaining that is not something that the bond funds allow us to do. this is why you came up with the idea of art care. >> i hope we get the community going and get people who really like to be involved. we will give them a chance to be involved. if you are interested in art, this is a marvelo
with all of the impacts of a hospital decide they want -- they want a big hospital and want to have to take care of everything else. i am very careful to know how each supervisor feels about the impact on the project. i would like cpmc to be successful because they do not have a lot of time. we would do the best we can and review every aspect of this so that they have the best chance of success. >> the issue of the state budgets have affected many local businesses. is there any way that the city could help more nonprofits? >> that is why i am proposing a set sales tax. the state did make some severe cuts. we do not know when those cuts will start that impacting the nonprofits. as you know, through our city budget, if you ask many of the nonprofits, they're pretty happy. we restored a lot of the original cuts. their services reflect the values that i hold, board of supervisors hold. now the state is making cuts, some in the same places that we've restored. we cannot promise to back fill all of those cuts. we can promise to go through the same process and asked what are the critical services
that is not always going to be on super bowl sunday on the big screen. it will not always capture that. if you want to push the revolution now and start handing of guns, you might shoot me, right? we do not have an understanding of exactly what needs to happen and how it needs to happen. i think education is critical. we have to push for an education that we're just not receiving for the most part. there are pockets of that happening, but i think that awareness will produce the next scenario -- the next generation of folks in entertainment, in the arts and all these arenas that are high-profile but with the embedded with this consciousness that will demand the stand up and say something. no more of the michael jordan cannot speak out because politics is not a good thing to speak out against. it will be the jamaican musicians, the peter toshes and bob marleys -- the people -- the politicians had to be responsive to what people were saying and doing because there was a movement around these high- profile folks. they cannot just represent the movement. they have to come out of the movement. it has to
think the business model in the media always changes. the big one that everyone has seen in their lifetime is, when i was a kid, tv was free. across america, it was funded by advertisers. today, the vast majority of americans pay a fee to get television. if the contact mix is right, hard journalism, entertainment, people will pay. all along the spectrum from the complete the paid to be completely ad-funded, you see it all today. one of the crisis we have now is the old model of classified advertising, paying for hard news journalism on paper has broken the, and is being replaced. that business model change had been a constant for 150 years. there are millions of models that work, and will be, and capital can chase them, as you get a 10x return, as you described. >> we want to get to everyone's questions. >> my name is alex. i have heard two major themes about new media. one, that it has a radical democratic potential, low barrier to entry, but i have also heard repeated again and again, in order for your model to be successful, in order for your web site to be successful,
there are some areas in some installations, depending on the leadership; the leadership plays a big role here. for the 2 years that we have had the psychological program in the national guard, we've seen over 5,000 individual service members. the number one concern is family and marital concerns. so, for those that are local to their communities and their families, they have to make that connection, as hector mentioned. it has to be connected back with the state, but the guard bureau and the states themselves have lots of programs in place that mimic, are very similar to active duty, as hector mentioned. we use our chaplain corps; we use our medical people, too. so, not to forget that the guard has programs similar to active duty. and when we come back, we're going to be talking a little bit more about services and about supporting military families. we'll be right back. they tell me i was there but i don't remember. i don't know where i really was. i do not know what i had for breakfast. i do not know who won the game. i don't recognize this man. if you or someone you know is struggling with
fish swim through the water it takes a big dive. >> and growing next to the river are a bed of flowers. opening one hand onfinger at a time watching the flower petal blossoms. we will take our other hand and turn it into a butterifiy much the butter fly will fly, fly, fly the and land on the flour and watch it fly away. drinking can a deer. take your thumb and the outside a n antlers. the deer hears a noise and in the distance is a hunter with a low and arrow. he sees that deer and aims for it. see your target and takes a shot and he misses and the deer escapes. the hunter's frustrated. i can't believe i missed that. he decides that hunting deer is not a night idea next time he will aim for an apple. thank you participating, you can sit down. give yourself a clap. those are very basic hand movements we use to tell a story. so, the next story we will show you is going to take place in this forest that we just created. i want you to imagine you are in the old forest and we will explain to you the story. >> that was namaste. the devine in me greets the devine in you. can you say that? ve
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)